Growing Ginger Roots from the Grocery Store

Getting ginger to form roots is very easy, provided you follow a few crucial steps to keep them from rotting. The trick is to plant ginger roots when it's warm outside, plant them in sphagnum moss or another breathable medium and go easy on the water until they form leaves and can be repotted. Here's a quick tutorial with a video and pictures.




First of all, here's a video in which I explain how to grow ginger and other grocery store ingredients such as pineapples, sugar cane and coconuts. I shot it for Troy-Bilt as a #Saturday6 member, but it's perfect for this post too!


How to Grow your Own Ginger

1. Select a Healthy Root. The best roots (rhizomes) for growing are firm, fleshy and already have green points forming at the end of the 'fingers.' If you prefer, cut the ginger into separate pieces with at least one green tip per segment and allow to dry for a few days.

2. Soak the Roots Overnight in warm water. This will stimulate growth and rinse off any chemicals that might be present. A few of my friends have also had a lot of success soaking their various root crops in compost tea, believe it or not!

3. Set the Roots in Sphagnum Moss (or coconut fiber) so that the top of the root is visible, with the green growing tips pointing up. I used a propagating tray, but you can use any container wide enough to accommodate the root. Keep the sphagnum moss lightly moist, but allow it to dry out between waterings.




4. Transplant to a Pot once the first leaves have formed. At this point you should notice a mass of fleshy white roots, which can be gently teased loose from the moss. Hold the root just beneath the edge of the pot, and fill the pot with fresh potting mix so that the fine roots are surrounded and the top of the rhizome is barely visible.

5. Caring for Your Ginger is easy, as long as you provide warmth, humidity, moisture and drainage. Summer is the best time to grow ginger because it's already hot and humid, but if you're growing it indoors you can place it in a bright windowsill and occasionally mist it with water. Drainage is provided by simply using a pot with drainage holes.

That's it! Be sure to let me know if you have any experiences to share or questions that I can answer. I also have a post on growing turmeric for those of you who are lucky enough to find it in the produce aisle!


Here are some other posts you might like: 

How to Grow Passionfruit From Leftover Seeds

Grow Garlic, Onions and Leeks from Scraps

All About Lemongrass

5 Unusual Uses for Okra

Living Air Plant Wreath

Handmade Paper Roses

Grow Dragonfruit from Seed

Make a Hanging String Garden

DIY Terrarium Light

Healthy Blueberry Muffins


28 comments:

  1. I loved this Steven....your best one to date!
    Mama D

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  2. Hi,
    Can I put the root (ginger or turmeric) on top of soil and peat moss and leave outside in sun? Or is it best to leave the root on a window sill inside and let the sun hit it?

    http://LivingItUpAlternatively.blogspot.com

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    Replies
    1. I would keep it out of direct sun at first and ease it out into brighter light slowly. Good question!

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  3. AND then what? how do you use it in cooking?

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  4. Chop it up finely and add it to stir fries, soups, spring rolls, salads, dressings and all sorts of Asian foods! You can also candy them, pickle them or use them in preserves.

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  5. I love fresh ginger and cook with it all the time. Great share, Steve!

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  6. Great video and post! I can see a lot of free food coming from my trash!

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  7. Thanks, Steve! This site is great--fabulous info and such gorgeous artwork.

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  8. Thanks for the tips, I just bought some fresh organic Ginger, and Turmeric so I can hardly wait. The tip about the sphagnum moss will be helpful. I was afraid it would be to hot where I live, but looks like I should be ok.

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  9. Can I assume that this will expand the root and you can cut some off, never buying it again? {if I don't kill it, that is!}.

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  10. when you say chop it up finely, do you mean the tuber part or the sprouting green part or both?

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  11. So... I'm supposed to keep the root above the soil?

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    1. You don't have to but it seems to help when you're getting it to root. After that you can lightly cover it with soil or mulch.

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  12. Hey Steve, I have been growing ginger for a few years now and I love your post! For me, I just place a fresh, washed ginger root (which is firm and has eyes developing) in a pot of potting soil. I place mine in a shady area (under a tree) and water it. The full rhizome is covered and it should come up within a few weeks. I water them every now and then and they do really well. They seem to love it here in Arkansas with our hot and humid growing season. I am going to have to try your method. It will make an interesting experiment.

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  13. I don"t believe I've seen any in the store with green buds. Under conditions do they sprout?

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    1. I bought some without sprouts, and have let it sit in the kitchen a few days and it is now sprouting. I would make sure its a fresh firm root and keep it sunny and warm until the eyes sprout and go from there. Good luck!

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  14. This is great advice! i already have a root with the first green leaf, My question is, how do i harvest it?? wich parts do i know are ready to use??
    thanx!

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    1. You have to wait for it to grow into a plant , probably a season. Then dig up the extra roots , or all of it, then replant some. Sort of like bulbs.

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  15. thank you ,ill try this method

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  16. Good advice, I will try to grow my own from now on. I love fresh ginger in tea, soups, stir fries and a salad I make with orange segments and salmon. I usually store left over pieces in the freezer, wrapped in foil and then grate them when needed, they will keep for a long time, best wishes Wendy

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  17. Hi Steve! I live in New Hampshire. I started my first ginger plant in June of 2013 outdoors. I used a store bought ginger rhizome, cut it up according to the nubs already forming, left the raw cut pieces out airing for a day or 2 then planted them in a large container (14"). I filled the large container with potting soil and compost, layed the 5 pieces of ginger on top and then covered them with an inch soil. I brought the container in the house at the start of fall season and it is still growing. I have dug down and cut off pieces here and there. The plant itself is about 3 1/2' tall. I read where it is a good idea to layer some small rocks under the container in the drain tray and keep the water level with the rocks. Also read about misting of the leaves and started to do that but have not continued. When a full year is up I will either harvest the whole plant or half and let it continue growing. I've read where you can do both. Supposedly, the leaves and stocks start to turn brown when ready to harvest. I don't know yet. I wished I could upload a picture to show. I'm a fairly new gardener so I go to the internet for my information. Hope this helps. Jeannie B.

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  18. I will try to grow ginger my own from now on. Thanks

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  19. i have been drying my sliced ginger on a tray with wash lemon orange and lime peels. I then pulverize them for baking and tea and all sorts of uses...Ginger is so amazing and a great cleanser

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  20. 1/2 lb. fresh ginger (I think we had a little bit more than that)
    1/2 cup sugar (plus extra for coating)
    water
    First, peel your ginger....Then thinly slice it .Next put your ginger in a small saucepan and cover it with about 2 cups of water. Put it on the stove and bring it to a boil.40-50 minutes to allow it to soften , add a little more water another small pan 1/2 c sugar stir as it thickens add soften ginger cook till coated, remove. Roll around in a little sugar. cool. This was recommended by my wholeistic DOC for mom as she was going through chemo. HELPS with nausea and it tastes so good!

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  21. Hi, how warm does the climate have to be to grow ginger? How do you know when it is ready to harvest? I love this idea. Thanks.

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  22. hey Steve, I love your site. Thanks for the wonderful ideas.

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Please feel free to share your questions, ideas and suggestions!